Oniji Ootani III (aka. Nakazou Nakamura II) as Edobee / Sharaku Toushuusai -

Product ID
0175
Name
Sharaku Toushuusai
Profile

The 18th century
Ukiyo-e artist

Size
425mm x 630mm
Roller End Material
Red sandalwood
Material of the Work
Chemical fiber
Stock Condition
In Stock
Description

Sharaku Toushuusai was an ukiyo-e artist in the middle of the Edo period. He published 145-odd artworks over a 10 month period from 1794 to 1795.

One of the main characters on the dramatic entertainment “Koinyoubou Somewake Tazuna,” held at Kawaharasaki-Za theater in May 1794, was depicted in this artwork. This drama showed the illicit intercourse incident between Yosaku Date, a vassals of the Daimyou (a Japanese feudal lord), and Shigenoi, Okujyochuu (a maid in a palace in Edo period).

Samanosuke, a young Lord, prepared a large sum of money to redeem a geisha (Japanese singing and dancing girl). Edobee, in the role of a villain, attacked Yakko Ippei, who is conveying the money. Indeed, the depiction of Edobee, getting threateningly closer with open arms, makes one feel the ghastliness of the wrongdoer. The composition is full of realistic sensations as if to convey a tense atmosphere on the stage.

The yakusha-e (paintings of actors) were, so to speak, photographic portraits of popular idols. When depictions of actors on the stage went on sale at the time of their performances, fans bought art depicting their favorite actor in a body. Many landscape ukiyo-e have survived, but these yakusha-e and the bijin-ga (paintings of beautiful women) were an essential genre of the ukiyo-e prints until the time when the landscape ukiyo-e attracted attention through the good reputation of Hokusai Katsushika’s Thirty-six Sceneries of Mt. Fuji. We can say that depicting the latest fashion and producing fresh topical works, for example the most popular performances and actors, were the very essential qualities of the ukiyo-e. Many yakusha-e (ukiyo-e-style actor prints) were produced by various ukiyo-e painters every time that kabuki performances were held. Why is Sharaku so popular among them now?

It was important for the fan of those days that depicted actors looked attractive on the ukiyo-e. However, Sharaku depicted features of the actors’ closeup face in detail, adding exaggeration. Oniji Ootani III As Yakko Edobee was the very representative that showed the features of Sharaku’s works saliently. The almond-shaped eyes, the big aquiline nose and the protruding jaw — Oniji Ootani is never depicted as a handsome man, but the work is full of the actor’s power, playing a villainous role completely.

This novelty style of Sharaku’s was welcomed with wonder at first, however the depiction that revealed facial faults didn’t become popular among the actors and fans. Toyokuni Utagawa, who was an ukiyo-e artist during the same period as Sharaku, had a beautiful painting style and was the most popular.

Thus Sharaku didn’t have a great success those days. However, he was introduced as one of the world’s top three portrait painters in a book by Julius Kurth (German art historian) after about 100 years, and his realistic depiction distinguished him from other ukiyo-e artists and was appreciated all over the world.

Sharaku and this work was unique as an ukiyo-e artist. However they became to be known to everyone because he depicted not only beauty and ugliness but also character and inner psychological world of actors.

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 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

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Name Art Nomura


President Tatsuji Nomura


Founded1973


Established1992


Address7-23 Babadori, Tarumi-ku, Kobe city,
Hyougo Prefecture, 655-0021, Japan



Capital10 million yen


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 Art Nomura is an art dealer which produces kakejiku (hanging scrolls). We mount many paintings and calligraphic works in kakejiku in my factory. Kakejiku are our main product. We also remount and repair old or damaged kakejiku. We share the traditional Japanese art of kakejiku with people all over the world.



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 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

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