Fuuryuu

Fuuryuu

“Fuuryuu” is one of the aesthetic values that became popular after the Middle Ages in Japan. It means gorgeous, elaborate designs intended to surprise other people, and was recognized together with “Basara” and “Suki” as the opposite of “Wabi” and “Sabi” (plain and quiet tastes). Later, it also came to mean performing arts, art objects and architecture which were in tune with the spirit of Fuuryuu. In the “Kagakushu” of the Muromachi period, it was written that, “Fuuryuu means popular things in Japan.” The meaning of the word in those days was slightly different from the modern one.

In the “Manyoshu,” it was given the Japanese reading “Miyabi” and held the additional meaning of “a curious mind”; in the Heian period, it meant historical events which were quoted in “Utaawase” (events where poems were written and read by two competing groups) or other events, objects or clothes from literature. After the end of the Heian Period, festival floats and clothes and the elaborate designs of the theater Suhamadai (standing trays with sandbar patterns) were called “Fuuryuu.” People who held such tastes were called “Fuuryuuza.” On the other hand, the original form of the “Fuuryuu” which was remembered by future generations as “to keep rhythm with music and songs” is recorded in events such as the 1096 Eicho Daidengaku, in which people from the aristocrats and government bureaucrats down to the common people wore Fuuryuu-style costumes and marched while playing Dengaku (a Japanese traditional performing art), and a festival of souls at Imamiya-jinja Shrine (in Kyoto City) in 1154, where a “Pleasure of Fuuryuu” was held, in which people held umbrellas decorated with Fuuryuu-style flowers and sang songs. After the period of the Northern and Southern Courts (Japan) in particular, powerful leaders like “Machishuu” (rich merchants) in the urban areas and “Otona” (leaders of farmer’s organizations) in the rural areas appeared, and “Fuuryuu” was included in the festivals and performing arts that they hosted. In the same period, people appeared as well as things: the “Hayashimono” who marched with flutes and drums and wore gorgeous clothes, the “Hyoshimono” who accompanied the Hayashimono and beat time for them, and the “Fuuryuu-odori” who danced in a group. From the late Sengoku period to the early Edo period, the government also showed favorable attitudes towards Fuuryuu, and in 1604, on the seventh anniversary of the death of Hideyoshi TOYOTOMI, the commerce and industry people of Kyoto held a big Fuuryuu-odori with support from the TOYOTOMI family. This “Fuuryuu” trend affected the temple performing arts of the same period, such as “Sarugaku,” “Nou” and “Kyougen.” In “Shikisanban,” one of the three elements of “Nougaku” (together with Nou and Kyougen) was called “Fuuryuu,” and meant to perform while singing, dressed in gaudy clothes; it was used as an important element of direction, and was also adopted by Kyougen direction. In 1660, Toraaki OKURA wrote a book called “Fuuryuu no Hon (The Book of Fuuryuu),” in which he recorded thirty Fuuryuu plays, but many of them are not performed anymore. The styles, performances and sensations of Fuuryuu affected “Kabuki” and “Bunraku,” which were established in the Edo period, the architecture of the Azuchi-Momoyama period, and Genroku culture. Its connection with the “Bon” dance, Buddhist invocations and New Year’s decorations today have also been pointed out.

Fuuryuu means “a refined, tasteful or elegant atmosphere” in Japan today.

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Our Feelings For Kakejiku


 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

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Company Profile
syaoku.jpg(120220 byte)

Name Art Nomura


President Tatsuji Nomura


Founded1973


Established1992


Address7-23 Babadori, Tarumi-ku, Kobe city,
Hyougo Prefecture, 655-0021, Japan



Capital10 million yen


URLhttp://nomurakakejiku.com


Our Business

 Art Nomura is an art dealer which produces kakejiku (hanging scrolls). We mount many paintings and calligraphic works in kakejiku in my factory. Kakejiku are our main product. We also remount and repair old or damaged kakejiku. We share the traditional Japanese art of kakejiku with people all over the world.



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 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

(or press ESC or click the overlay)