Famous Organization of Nihonga

Nitten (Japan Fine Arts Exhibition)

The “Nitten” is the most popular of all the great art organizations in Japan. The Nitten has a long and industrious history, which began in 1907 as a result of the First Ministry of Education Art Exhibition. In the beginning, the exhibition was referred to as the “Bunten.” In 1919, the Imperial Art Academy was established, and following this, the exhibition was renamed “The Imperial Art Exhibition” or the “Teiten.” In 1935 and 1937, the Imperial Art Academy was reorganized, and once again it was referred to as the Bunten. In 1946, after World War II, the management of the Imperial Art Academy was taken over by the Japan Fine Arts Exhibition, and the Nitten was formed. In 1958, the non-profit corporation Nitten was established, and the exhibition became privately managed. Recently, the Nitten has changed its legal status to a Public Interest Incorporated Association, pursuant to the reform of Public Interest Corporation System.
Throughout Nitten’s long and developing history, its contribution to the modern Japanese art world has been progound. Today, the Nitten claims to be the largest combined art exhibition of its kind in the world, attracting a great number of fans and critics. The Nitten comprises five art faculties; namely, Japanese Style and Western Style Paintings, Sculpture, Craft as Art, and Calligraphy. Each of the departments features works of new but talented artists alongside works of the great masters of modern Japanese art.
The Nitten is opened for public viewing every autumn at The National Art Center, Tokyo. It is expected that about 200,000 spectators will enjoy the exhibition prior to its tour of the principal cities of Japan; during the tour, another 300,000 people are expected to take part.

Nihon Bijutsuin (The Japan Art Academy)

“Nihon Bijutsuin,” called “Inten,” is a non-governmental artistic organization in Japan, dedicated to “Nihonga” (Japanese-style painting). The academy promotes the art of Nihonga through an exhibition, the “Inten” Exhibition.

History
The Nihon Bijutsuin was founded by Tenshin Okakura at the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music in 1898, together with a group of artists, which included Gahou Hashimoto, Taikan Yokoyama, Kanzan Shimomura, Shunsou Hishida, and several others, as a protest against the stylistic restrictions of the government-sponsored “Bunten” exhibitions. Nihon Bijutsuin moved, with Okakura to Izura, Ibaraki (now the city of Ibaraki) in 1906. However, Okakura soon lost interest in guiding the new organization after being recruited by Ernest Francisco Fenollosa to assist in the latter’s efforts to introduce Chinese and Japanese arts to the Western world via the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. When Okakura died in 1913, the group dissolved. A year later, in 1914, Nihon Bijutsuin was revived under Yokoyama, who relocated it back to Yanaka, Tokyo. In 1920, separate sections were established for Japanese sculpture and for Western-style painting (“youga”). These separate sections were abolished in 1960, and the Institute is currently devoted exclusively to Nihonga painting.

Inten Exhibitions
The most important function of Nihon Bijutsuin is the organization and promotion of the Inten fine arts exhibitions. The Spring Exhibition is held in early April, for two weeks at the Mitsukoshi Department Store in Tokyo, followed by a tour around Japan for four months, at ten different locations. The sizes of the works which can be displayed is fixed at under 150 x 75 cm for rectangular works, and under 106 x 106 cm for square works.
The Fall Exhibition is held in September, for two weeks at the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, followed by a year-long tour to 10 different locations around Japan. The Fall Exhibition contains larger works, with 225 x 180 cm as the upper limit.

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Our Feelings For Kakejiku


 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

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Company Profile
syaoku.jpg(120220 byte)

Name Art Nomura


President Tatsuji Nomura


Founded1973


Established1992


Address7-23 Babadori, Tarumi-ku, Kobe city,
Hyougo Prefecture, 655-0021, Japan



Capital10 million yen


URLhttp://nomurakakejiku.com


Our Business

 Art Nomura is an art dealer which produces kakejiku (hanging scrolls). We mount many paintings and calligraphic works in kakejiku in my factory. Kakejiku are our main product. We also remount and repair old or damaged kakejiku. We share the traditional Japanese art of kakejiku with people all over the world.



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 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

(or press ESC or click the overlay)