Tokonoma Album 009: Tachibina, Namu-Daishi-Henjou-Kongou, etc

 

Tokonoma & Kakejiku Scroll: Tachibina Doll in a Standing Pose

tachibina tokonoma alcove kakejiku scroll

In China, there was a custom of purifying the body by the water, holding a fest and exorcise at the “Joshi Festival” on March 3rd. Eventually in Japan, a unique version of “Joshi Festival” was born by the mixture of China’s custom, and Japan’s ancient thought about exorcism called “Misogi-harai” and a tradition of letting dolls (called “Hitogata”) made by plants and paper in the river.
Meanwhile, activities using paper dolls were popular among girls of aristocracy. This was called “Hiina (dolls) Asobi (game) “. It is thought that the game was linked to the tradition of letting dolls in the river, and the “*Nagashi-bina“event was born.

In the Edo period, since the art of making dolls was improved, Hina dolls became gorgeous. Consequently, the dolls were considered as decorations for home like today’s “Hinadan-kazari” (Hina dolls display).


*Nagashi-bina: paper dolls floated downriver

 

 

Tokonoma & Kakejiku Scroll: Namu-Daishi-Henjou-Kongou

taigen kobayashi tokonoma namudaishi calligraphy

“Namu-Daishi-Henjou-Kongou” is an 8 kanji (Chinese characters) phrase, meaning “to believe in Vairocana and to respect Koubou-Daishi (a famous Japanese monk).” “Namu” means “I have faith in you.” “Daishi” means Koubou-Daishi. “Henjou” means “the sacred light of Buddha shines all over the world.” “Kongou” means an indestructible substance. This is why “Henjou-Kongou” means Vairocana.
The kakejiku (hanging scroll) with the script of Namu-Daishi-Henjou-Kongou is used in the Buddhist memorial service of the “Shingon-shuu” sect. This Namu-Daishi-Henjou-Kongou was written by Taigen Kobayashi, the chief priest of the Ôbai-in subtemple of the Daitoku-ji temple, located in Kyôto.

 

 

Tokonoma & Kakejiku Scroll: Mandarin Duck

Mandarin Duck kakejiku oshidori

In Japan, the loving married couples are called “Oshidori Fufu (happily married couple)”, but it is considered that the origin of that is the Chinese historical allusion, “Enou no Chigiri (having a happy and harmonious relationship of a husband and wife)”.

Once upon a time in the Age of the Warring States in China.
King Kang of Song took Kanghyo, his vassal’s beautiful wife by authority.
Kanghyo killed himself because of too much strong indignation, but his wife also, left a will saying
“I want to be buried with my husband”
and followed him and killed herself.

People deeply sympathized with the two, but King Kang angered for this and built their graves facing each other on purpose and declared
“If you want to combine the graves into one, you can just try it.”

It was an irony foreseeing that “such a thing cannot be done”.

On the contrary, trees of catalpa suddenly came out for one night from each grave.
In addition, after 10 days, the branches of the two trees connected and their roots were intertwined into one. By the trees of catalpa, their two graves were combined into one.

And it is said that on the branch of this tree, a couple of mandarin ducks (Oshidori) settled down and sadly chirped all day.

This is the origin of “Oshidori Fufu”.

Tadashi Mukaidani: quoted from the Origin of “Oshidori Fufu”

 

 

Tokonoma & Kakejiku Scroll: Akafuji, Red Mt. Fuji

Akafuji Red Mt. Fuji

Mt. Fuji has, since ancient times, long inspired many painters, because its magnificent image has long been worshipped all over Japan. When Mt. Fuji is tinted red by the sun’s rays, the image is called “Aka-Fuji” (Red Mt. Fuji). This superb view, which is rarely seen by most people, has long been considered a very lucky symbol. This is why a kakejiku of Aka-fuji is often displayed for New Year holidays as well as ordinary days, while other usual kakejiku are rarely displayed. (Most Japanese people want to have a happy New Year).

 

 

Tokonoma & Kakejiku Scroll: Buddhas Painting

Buddha painting kakejiku tokonoma

 

 

 

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CEO Message

Our Feelings For Kakejiku


 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

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Company Profile
syaoku.jpg(120220 byte)

Name Art Nomura


President Tatsuji Nomura


Founded1973


Established1992


Address7-23 Babadori, Tarumi-ku, Kobe city,
Hyougo Prefecture, 655-0021, Japan



Capital10 million yen


URLhttp://nomurakakejiku.com


Our Business

 Art Nomura is an art dealer which produces kakejiku (hanging scrolls). We mount many paintings and calligraphic works in kakejiku in my factory. Kakejiku are our main product. We also remount and repair old or damaged kakejiku. We share the traditional Japanese art of kakejiku with people all over the world.



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Access Map

Access Map


 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

(or press ESC or click the overlay)