Ukiyo-e Kakejiku: New Item to More Easily Enjoy Ukiyo-e Art

Ukiyo-e

Ukiyo-e is a genre of the pictorial arts that originated during the Edo period. Bold composition and bright colors are typical of Ukiyo-e.
Ukiyo-e has always amazed the world. It arrived in Europe in the 1860’s and influenced European impressionists heavily. Although art production was ruined after the Meiji Restoration, its impact continues to this day. Artistic influence has enriched European art and present Manga & Anime.
Ukiyo-e is perhaps the most famous Japanese visual art in the world. Ukiyo-e is the world’s only vividly-colored woodblock print; Western pictorial art has no such category, which is thought to encourage its appreciation. It is also valuable that Ukiyo-e is the only material in the world that depicts the varied lives of ordinary people in the Medieval period. According to the documents of the Meiji period, there were close to 2,000 Eshi painters until that time, if unknown Eshi painters are included. Because 100 to 200 pieces were printed for each work at that time, huge numbers of Ukiyo-e appeared in the cities and, unlike anywhere else in the world, high-quality works of art were very popular among ordinary people. There were many world-famous Ukiyo-e artists; Hokusai Katsushika, Hiroshige Utagawa, Sharaku Toushiuusai, etc.

To tell the truth, I was more familiar with Japanese-style painters, for example Oukyo Maruyama, Jakuchuu Itou, Soutatsu Tawaraya, Kourin Ogata, etc, than Ukiyo-e artists, even they were all artists of Edo period. This is because I deal in the kakejiku, in which Ukiyo-e has not ever been mounted. However I couldn’t leave Ukiyo-e as it is from the viewpoint of the influence of Japanese visual art, so I studied it again and was more absorbed in the Ukiyo-e world than I had expected. It goes without saying that Ukiyo-e has high artistic quality. Besides, there are many comical and witty artworks.
Shunga (erotic arts) were often sold in package deals. Because their selling prices were high, a lot of money could be used for production and high-level production techniques were employed. Therefore, it is said that the most significant technique of the ukiyoe was used for shunga. This fact is very impressive for me.


Segawa37 / Ukiyo-e Animated Gifs

I found an interesting article in Yahoo! News the other day. The title is “Ukiyo-e Animated Gifs Become a Popular Topic in the World.” Segawa37, a Japanese animator, posted a series of Ukiyo-e animated gifs which were remade by Segawa37 on Twitter because of a specifications change of Twitter. And then, they have received a great response in not only Japan but also the world. I wonder what the works are like and watched them. Then there were many amusing works.

Segawa 37 expressed the dynamic waves of Hokusai’s masterpiece “Great Wave off Kanagawa,” arguably the most famous Ukiyo-e of all on his own animated gif work. In the work “Yoshida at Toukaidou,” which has unique composition of Mt. Fuji seen from a tea house, a bullet train is running by the tea house. In other comical work, a kimono-clad woman emits a laser beam toward an aircraft. Segawa37 expresses the attractiveness of Ukiyo-e in a modern style. I found the reason why these animated gifs became a popular topic all over the world. In addition, I recognized again how popular Ukiyo-e is in the world.

 

Great Wave off Kanagawa gif
Great Wave off Kanagawa / Hokusai Katsushika

 

Yoshida at Toukaidou / Hokusai Katsushika gif
Yoshida at Toukaidou / Hokusai Katsushika

 

Yoshida at Toukaidou / Hokusai Katsushika gif
Morning in Winter / Hokusai Katsushika

 

Oniji Ootani III (aka. Nakazou Nakamura II) as Edobee / Sharaku Toushuusai gif
Oniji Ootani III (aka. Nakazou Nakamura II) as Edobee / Sharaku Toushuusai

 

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku

Ukiyo-e were originally woodblock prints, but there are now many reprinted versions of Ukiyo-e thanks to recent advancement in printing technology. However, most of them are framed. They are too bulky to carry easily, so they are therefore slightly inconvenient as souvenirs or gifts. Even if you only get the work itself, you will have to take it to a frame shop. Moreover, if you want to change position of the framed work on your gallery wall depending on how you feel during the day, it will be a little bothersome because of its bulk and weight. If you want to store the work until the best position is decided, it will take up a lot of space. You can never fold it.

I considered what to do to get more people to enjoy Ukiyo-e, whose popularity hasn’t declined yet. And then, I thought of ”Ukiyo-e Kakejiku.”

 

 

 

 

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku

 

 

Click >>>> Brochure (PDF)

 

 

 

 

Japanese people enjoy changing paintings depending on occasions, guests and the seasons. The kakejiku (Japanese hanging scroll) is the most suitable form of picture in terms of allowing ease in changing the paintings at any time. The beauty of scrolls is that they can be rolled up, which makes them compact, portable and easy to store. Moreover the kakejiku is very light and easy to handle. Ukiyo-e Kakejiku makes good use of the features of the kakejiku. You can easily change your own wall gallery depending on how you feel that day.

You can roll the Ukiyo-e Kakejiku up easily

You can roll the Ukiyo-e Kakejiku up easily

 

You can store the Ukiyo-e Kakejiku compactly

You can store the Ukiyo-e Kakejiku compactly

 

In addition, the mounting, which is both decorative and also serves to protect the main work, is called the hyougu. People see the combination of the two as one work of art and appreciate this. Elegant, gorgeous damask (donsu) and gold brocade (kinran), made in the Nishijin district of Kyoto, are used for the Ukiyo-e Kakejiku. Compared with dull frames, hyougu can give a more unique atmosphere to your room.

 

Kinran (Gold brocade)

Kinran (Gold brocade)

 

Donsu (Damask)

Donsu (Damask)

 


As Segawa37 conveyed the attractiveness of Ukiyo-e through gifs, I would like more people around the world to enjoy it through the kakejiku.


 

 

 

Oniji Ootani III (aka. Nakazou Nakamura II) as Edobee / Sharaku Toushuusai

Oniji Ootani III (aka. Nakazou Nakamura II) as Edobee / Sharaku Toushuusai

 

 

Click >>>> More Info

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Dancing Woman / Hokusai Katsushika

A Dancing Woman / Hokusai Katsushika

 

 

Click >>>> More Info

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fine Wind, Clear Morning (Red Mt. Fuji) / Hokusai Katsushika

Fine Wind, Clear Morning (Red Mt. Fuji) / Hokusai Katsushika

 

 

 

Click >>>> More Info

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Wave off Kanagawa / Hokusai Katsushika

Great Wave off Kanagawa / Hokusai Katsushika

 

 

Click >>>> More Info

 

 

 

 

 


 

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 001

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 001

 

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 002

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 002

 

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 003

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 003

 

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 004

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 004

 

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 005

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 005

 

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 006

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 006

 

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 007

Ukiyo-e Kakejiku display 007

 

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CEO Message

Our Feelings For Kakejiku


 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

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Company Profile
syaoku.jpg(120220 byte)

Name Art Nomura


President Tatsuji Nomura


Founded1973


Established1992


Address7-23 Babadori, Tarumi-ku, Kobe city,
Hyougo Prefecture, 655-0021, Japan



Capital10 million yen


URLhttp://nomurakakejiku.com


Our Business

 Art Nomura is an art dealer which produces kakejiku (hanging scrolls). We mount many paintings and calligraphic works in kakejiku in my factory. Kakejiku are our main product. We also remount and repair old or damaged kakejiku. We share the traditional Japanese art of kakejiku with people all over the world.



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Access Map


 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

(or press ESC or click the overlay)