Kishi School / Schools of Nihonga 008

Kishi School

Kishi School is a school in the Kyoto circle that existed from the late Edo period to the Meiji period. Its founder is Ganku. Kishi School competed with Maruyama School as a school of artists who painted pictures of objects they observed in front of them. The painting style of Ganku was inherited by his eldest son Gantai (1782-1865) and adopted child Ganryou (1797-1852). Among the many disciples of this school are such artists as Bumpou Kawamura, Kanzan Yokoyama and Kayou Shirai. Although Chikudou Kishi of the Meiji period pioneered a new style of painting based on modern perspectives, Kishi School was not blessed with good works and disappeared from the world of Japanese painting of the modern period.


Ganku


Ganku (1756 or 1749 – January 19, 1839) was a painter who lived in the Edo period. He was the patriarch of the Kishi-ha (the Kishi school).
Originally named Saeki Masaaki, the artist was born in the city of Kanazawa on Japan’s north coast in either 1749 or 1756, (records of his birth are in conflict). He moved to Kyoto in 1773 and became a retainer to Prince Arisugawa. In 1804 he entered the imperial court as an official and was appointed Echizen-no-Suke, honorary governor of Echizen Province. He again lived in Kanazawa from 1809 and finally settled in Iwakura outside Kyoto in 1813. In the same year he officially adopted the artist’s name Ganku Kishi. Initially, Ganku studied Kanou-style painting, but early in his studies he shifted to explore the Nanpin style named for the Chinese painter Shen Nanpin (active early 18th century). Following his study of Nanpin, he explored Japanese “naturalism” under Oukyo Maruyama and nanga-inspired “naturalism” under Goshun Matsumura of the Shijou school in Kyoto. Perhaps unsatisfied with any of these popular styles, he founded his own school, the Kishi school, characterized by a rough and vigorous brush style but still reflective of the many influences his training had provided.

Tiger Paintings of Ganku


Ganku is most well known as a painter of animals, in particular tigers. His works exhibit an almost Western-seeming solidity and are often filled with a sense of drama conveyed both by the subject matter and his muscular brushwork. He studied tigers through tiger’s bones, so that his tigers paintings were clearly different from conventional ones, which were depicted based on cats.

Kishi School Works

Tiger and Waves / Ganku / Kishi School

 

Kishi School Work

Tiger / Ganku / Kishi School

 

Tiger Ganku02

Tiger / Ganku / Kishi School

 

Kishi School Work

Tiger and Dragon / Ganku / Kishi School

 

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Our Feelings For Kakejiku


 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

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Company Profile
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Name Art Nomura


President Tatsuji Nomura


Founded1973


Established1992


Address7-23 Babadori, Tarumi-ku, Kobe city,
Hyougo Prefecture, 655-0021, Japan



Capital10 million yen


URLhttp://nomurakakejiku.com


Our Business

 Art Nomura is an art dealer which produces kakejiku (hanging scrolls). We mount many paintings and calligraphic works in kakejiku in my factory. Kakejiku are our main product. We also remount and repair old or damaged kakejiku. We share the traditional Japanese art of kakejiku with people all over the world.



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 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

(or press ESC or click the overlay)