Maruyama Shijou School / Schools of Nihonga 003

Maruyama Shijou School / Maruyama / Shijou-ha

Maruyama Shijou School is a name used to refer to both Maruyama School, a school founded by Maruyama Oukyo (1733-95) of the mid-Edo period, and Shijou School, a school in the lineage of Maruyama School established by Matsumura Gekkei (Goshun, 1752-1811).

Maruyama Shijou

Portrait of Oukyo Maruyama

 

Maruyama Shijou

Portrait of Goshun Matsumura

 

In his youth, Oukyo studied  painting in the Kanou School, which is characterized by the use of model painting (funpon), but later established a new style of painting in which he fused traditional decorativeness with a technique he found that is based on realistic expression using techniques, such as the contourless painting of the ink painting (tsuketate), Oukyo’s realistic but decorative style gained the support of the upper class townspeople of Kyoto and led to the establishment of a school of painting.

Model painting (funpon)

Funpon is a model or a draft used for a painting or a sculpture: a copy. Its purpose is mainly to transmit images. There are various kinds of model painting. In some, even the colors of the original are copied, while in others only lines are drawn in “sumi” ink; in some, color is applied faintly, while in others the names of colors are noted. Model painting for transmitting Buddhist iconographic pictures of Esoteric Buddhism is highly artistic and is valuable as reference material.

 

Although Goshun, at first, was a disciple of Buson Yosa and leaned toward the literati painting (bunjinga, nanga), after studying under Oukyo, he developed his own style by fusing the sentiments of the literati painting and the realism of Oukyo. Since many artists of this group lived in Shijou district of Kyoto, the name Shijou School came to be used to refer to the group. The group continued to flourish until the Meiji period and many talented artists, such as Seihou Takeuchi, appeared. This school formed the foundation for nihonga of the moderen period in Kyoto.

Sessho-zu Byobu / Maruyama Shijou

Sessho-zu Byobu (the folding screen with the painting of pine trees in snow) / Oukyo Maruyama

 

Hozugawa-zu Byobu / Maruyama Shijou

Hozugawa-zu Byobu (the folding screen with the painting of Hozu-gawa River) / Oukyo Maruyama

 

Matsu-ni-kujaku / Maruyama Shijou

Matsu-ni-kujaku (the mural painting of pine trees and peacocks) / Oukyo Maruyama

 

Puppies / Maruyama Shijou

Puppies / Oukyo Maruyama

 

Hakubai-zu Byoubu / Goshun Matsumura

Hakubai-zu Byoubu (the folding screen with plum blossoms painting) / Goshun Matsumura

 


Please refer to the “Daijou-ji” temple (Oukyo temple).

Literati painting / Bunjinga and Nanga

Literati painting
The term bunjin means high-ranking officials or educated men and intellectuals who led a life away from the hustle and bustle of secular life; they were at the center of Chinese culture. The literati painting is the term used to refer to paintings that these men painted for their own enjoyment, and the word did not indicate a specific painting style at first. However, the literati painting gradually began to be painted intentionally. The ink painting was used as the main method of expression and common ideas in terms of theme and style exist in the literati painting. With its beginning in the Eastern Han dynasty, the literati painting reached its peak during the Northern Song dynasty and a defnite style of painting was established by the end of the Yuan dynasty. In the Ming dynasty, Dong Qichang (1555-1636) pointed out the superiority of the literati painting by categorizing it into beizonghua by professional artists and nanzoughua that express spiritual concepts. Paintings influenced by the literati painting of the Ming and Qing dynasties became popular during the Edo period.

Nanga
Nanga is a type of literati painting that was popular in Japan during the Edo period. The name has its origin in the nanzonghua of the Ming dynasty in China. The influence of nanzonghua is also strong in its style. Other styles of Chinese painting were also incorporated to give nanga its own unique style. Taiga Ike and Buson Yosa are famous nanga artists.

 

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 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

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Name Art Nomura


President Tatsuji Nomura


Founded1973


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Address7-23 Babadori, Tarumi-ku, Kobe city,
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 Art Nomura is an art dealer which produces kakejiku (hanging scrolls). We mount many paintings and calligraphic works in kakejiku in my factory. Kakejiku are our main product. We also remount and repair old or damaged kakejiku. We share the traditional Japanese art of kakejiku with people all over the world.



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 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

(or press ESC or click the overlay)