Beautiful Woman Painting / Koushn Yamamoto - Bijinga

Product ID
B0021
Name
Koushn Yamamoto
Profile

A Japanese-style painter

Size
722mm x 1940mm
Roller End Material
Red sandalwood
Material of the Work
Silk
Price
JPY 20,000
Stock Condition
In stock
Description

“Tanabata” is one of the days of “sekku” (a day of the turn of the season) in Japan, China, Taiwan, Vietnam, and Korea.It is one of the “Gosekku” (the five seasonal festivals). Though it refers to the night of July 7 (lunar calendar), “Tanabata Matsuri (festival)” is held in Japan either on July 7 or a month later on August 7, as “Bon” festival is also held either in July or in August, after the Meiji revision of the calendar. Tanabata was originally an event celebrated in China and was introduced into Japan during the Nara period. The term tanabata was born when the above was combined with Japanese indigenous legend of “Tanabatatsume.”
The legend of the Weaver and the Cowherd first appeared in “The Nineteen Old Poems,” compiled during the Han period and selected in “Bunsen” (literature), but its relationship to July 7 is not clear. In “Keiso Saijiki” written during the period of the Northern and Southern Courts (China), it was stated that the Cowherd and the Weaver meet on July 7 and on that night, women prayed for the progress of sewing by threading colorful threads into the eyes of seven needles and setting up offerings in the garden. From the above description, the fact that “Kikkouden,” which was held on July 7, was linked with the legend of the Weaver and the Cowherd is clearly understood. The following description appears in the “Novel (In Un)” written by Inun in the Rikucho Ryo period (Southern court), “A lady weaver resided in the east of the Milky Way and she was a child of Tentei (God of Hosts). She was always busy weaving “hagoromo” (feather-robes) of “unkin” (clouds and brocade) and had no time to make herself up. Tentei felt pity for her solitude and allowed her to marry Qianniulang (the Cowherd) of the west of the river. When she ceased to weave after being married, Tentei became angry, ordered her to return to the east of the Milky Way and allowed her to meet him only once a year.” The above is the oldest historical literature that can verify the currently known story of tanabata.
It is thought that tanabata originated as the Japanese traditional festival in which people pray for a good harvest to the spirits of ancestors (Bon festival) merged with Kikkouden, a festival imported from China in which women pray for the progress of sewing, and the Buddhist festival of “Urabon-e” (Bon festival). By writing wishes on “tanzaku” (strips of colored paper) and hanging them on bamboo branches is a common practice around the nation. Hanging tanzaku on bamboo branches is a unique Japanese practice and it was created during the Edo period based on bamboo set at the both sides of cogon grass ring for “Natsugoshi no Oharae” (great purification ceremony). Tanzaku’s five colors, which are mentioned in the lyrics of a song “Tanabata-sama,” refer to green, red, yellow, white and black based on “Gogyou-setsu” (the theory of five elements). As Kikkouden, mentioned above, is a festival to pray for improving the technique of the arts, it is believed that wishes to be written on tanzaku are supposed to be about accomplishments. Tanzaku is also influenced by five colored-segakibata of Buddhism which is used at the Buddhist service for “segaki” (Hungry Ghosts).
This work is “bijinga” (portrait of a beautiful woman) by Koushun Yamamoto. There is a traditional custom of tanabata in Japan to to pray for the progress of sewing by reflecting a starry sky in surface of water in the tub and threading a needle above it. Koushun Yamamoto depicted this custom in his painting. This is a very interesting work through which we can see the Japanese traditional custom.





 

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Our Feelings For Kakejiku


 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

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Company Profile
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Name Art Nomura


President Tatsuji Nomura


Founded1973


Established1992


Address7-23 Babadori, Tarumi-ku, Kobe city,
Hyougo Prefecture, 655-0021, Japan



Capital10 million yen


URLhttp://nomurakakejiku.com


Our Business

 Art Nomura is an art dealer which produces kakejiku (hanging scrolls). We mount many paintings and calligraphic works in kakejiku in my factory. Kakejiku are our main product. We also remount and repair old or damaged kakejiku. We share the traditional Japanese art of kakejiku with people all over the world.



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 The Japanese people have long set a high value on aesthetic senses since ancient times. As a result, the
peculiar culture which is not seen in other countries blossomed and many aspects of the modern Japanese
culture come from it. Parts of Japanese culture has been introduced to people in other countries recently,
so the number of people from other countries who are interested in Japanese culture has been increasing.
However, the Japanese aesthetic senses, which are the bases of Japanese culture, have been nurtured
through a long history, intertwining various elements intricately, such as climate, geographical features,
religion, customs and so on. Therefore, they are very difficult to understand not only for people from other
countries, but even for the Japanese people. I think the best tool which conveys these difficult senses
understandably is a “kakejiku.”
 The kakejiku (a hanging scroll; a work of calligraphy or a painting which is mounted and hung in an
alcove or on a wall) is a traditional Japanese art. It's no exaggeration to say that paintings are what
express aesthetic senses at all times and places. The kakejiku is an art which expresses the Japanese
aesthetic senses. The kakejiku has long been used in traditional Japanese events, daily life and so on since
ancient times. As a result, there are various customs of kakejiku in Japan; kakejiku and the life of the
Japanese are closely related. We can see Japanese values through kakejiku.
 The kakejiku is a cultural tradition which the Japanese people should be proud of. However, many people
in other countries don't know much about it because it hasn't been showcased as much. This is why I
decided to try to introduce it. The kakejiku world is very interesting and beautiful. We want not only the
Japanese, but also many people from other countries to know and enjoy it. I hope that many people will
love kakejiku someday.

(or press ESC or click the overlay)